Archive for the 'article' Category

Jul 26 2009


Schools slowly add phones, PDAs to curriculum

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By Colleen Long
updated 7:05 p.m. ET, Thurs., July. 23, 2009
NEW YORK—

From MSNBC.com
Smartphones now have hundreds of applications meant to educate kids — from graphic calculators to animation programs that teach spelling and phonics.

And while most public schools don’t allow the devices because they’re considered distractions — and sometimes portable cheating tools — some school districts have started to put the technology to use.
Read the entire article at this link.

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Jul 15 2009


Textbooks and Their Future

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From Knowledgeworks 

July 6th, 2009 by Jim Moulton

Textbooks.  Remember bringing them home in sixth grade to cover them with brown paper shopping bags?  And did you ever get a detention because they weren’t covered by the end of the second week of school? Did you ever lust for the Teacher’s Edition of the text, knowing that it did, in fact, contain “all the answers?”

In a July 5, 2009 article posted in the business section on the New York Times’ web site, “We Rent Movies, So Why Not Textbooks?” Miguel Helft writes about Chegg.com and their textbook rental business.

Read the entire article from Knowledgeworks here.

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Jul 15 2009


Beauty Before Brains: The links between physical attractiveness and grades.

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If you survived high school, or hope to, you probably made your peace with the fact that life is unfair: looks can compensate for a lack of brains and conscientiousness. Or to put it more bluntly, teachers give good-looking kids higher grades than homely ones, all other factors being equal, as numerous studies have found. The phenomenon is so well documented in science it even has a name: the attractiveness effect.
Read the entire article at Newsweek.com

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Jul 15 2009


How much homework is too much?

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updated 4:42 p.m. ET, Tues., July 14, 2009

Christina Harris doesn’t believe kindergartners should have homework. So at the beginning of her son’s kindergarten year, she flat-out told the teacher he wouldn’t be doing any.

“I don’t believe that there’s any use for it,” said Harris, of Federal Way, Wash. “I think that’s a complete waste of childhood.” Read the entire article at MSNBC

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Jan 10 2009


Schools: Moving From Team Sport to Lifelong Fitness

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NY Times Long Island Section
Addressing the alarming statistics about childhood obesity, schools are adopting programs that focus on health rather than competition.

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Jan 04 2009


New Study Shows Time Spent Online Important for Teen Development

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The MacArthur Foundation
November 20, 2008

Digital Media & Learning, Press Releases

(San Francisco, CA) — Results from the most extensive U.S. study on teens and their use of digital media show that America’s youth are developing important social and technical skills online – often in ways adults do not understand or value.

“It might surprise parents to learn that it is not a waste of time for their teens to hang out online,” said Mizuko Ito, University of California, Irvine researcher and the report’s lead author. “There are myths about kids spending time online – that it is dangerous or making them lazy. But we found that spending time online is essential for young people to pick up the social and technical skills they need to be competent citizens in the digital age.”
Read the entire article here.

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Dec 28 2008


Should the Obama Generation Drop Out?

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By CHARLES MURRAY
Published: December 27, 2008 NY Times Editorial from the Week in Review
BARACK OBAMA has two attractive ideas for improving post-secondary education — expanding the use of community colleges and tuition tax credits — but he needs to hitch them to a broader platform. As president, Mr. Obama should use his bully pulpit to undermine the bachelor’s degree as a job qualification. Here’s a suggested battle cry, to be repeated in every speech on the subject: “It’s what you can do that should count when you apply for a job, not where you learned to do it.”

The residential college leading to a bachelor’s degree at the end of four years works fine for the children of parents who have plenty of money. It works fine for top students from all backgrounds who are drawn toward academics. But most 18-year-olds are not from families with plenty of money, not top students, and not drawn toward academics. They want to learn how to get a satisfying job that also pays well. That almost always means education beyond high school, but it need not mean four years on a campus, nor cost a small fortune. It need not mean getting a bachelor’s degree.

I am not discounting the merits of a liberal education. Students at every level should be encouraged to explore subjects that will not be part of their vocation. It would be even better if more colleges required a rigorous core curriculum for students who seek a traditional bachelor’s degree. My beef is not with liberal education, but with the use of the degree as a job qualification. Read the whole article in the NY Times here.

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Dec 21 2008


Google Offers New Image Search Parameters

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This afternoon Google announced that it has made it a little easier to refine image searches. Until now, if you entered a search term in Google Images you would get all kinds of images including photographs, drawings, paintings, and clip art. Now you can refine those results by selecting “faces,” “clip art,” “line drawings,” “photo content,” or “news content” from a drop down menu.

Applications for Education
Google calls the new image search options search-by-style, I call it just plain helpful. Any tool that can help students focus their searches is useful in my book. Less time struggling to find appropriate search results can translate into more time spent thinking, writing, and creating.

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Dec 16 2008


Updated Bloom’s Taxonomy

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By Colette Cassinelli

TechLearning magazine had a great article by Andrew Churches that connects how blogging, wikis, video and other participatory media are matched up with each of the updated Bloom’s taxonomy.

 Bloom’s taxonomy follows the thinking process. You can not understand a concept if you do not first remember it, similarly you can not apply knowledge and concepts if you do not understand them. It is a continuum from Lower Order Thinking Skills (LOTS) to Higher Order Thinking Skills (HOTS).

I think this chart (below)  will help educators see the value of embedding technology into their curriculum instead of relying on lecture, test (and hope for the best!) format.  By giving opportunities for students to analyze and create new media they are using higher-order thinking skills that are much more advanced than just “remembering” content for a test.
Read the entire article here.

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Dec 16 2008


21st Century Pedagogy

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Even if you have a 21st Century classroom (flexible and adaptable); even if you are a 21st century teacher ; (an adaptor, a communicator, a leader and a learner, a visionary and a model, a collaborator and risk taker) even if your curriculum reflects the new paradigm and  you have the facilities and resources that could enable 21st century learning – you will only be a 21st century teacher if how you teach changes as well. Your pedagogy must also change.

So what is 21st Century pedagogy? http://www.21centuryconnections.com/node/653

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